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1300 Frenchtown Road
East Greenwich, RI 02818 USA
Telephone: 401-885-0545
Frederick Jaggi, President





George H. Corliss Steam Engine Company

This engine was designed by George Henry Corliss and built by his Corliss Steam Engine Company. The unique Corliss valve gear made this engine more efficient than others and the design was widely copied. This engine was installed in a mill in Stratton Maine that made made turned wood products. It ran for a long time and was only taken out of service when it's cylinder head accidentally blew off.

A new cylinder head was cast by Terry Spencer of Philbrick, Booth and Spencer, Hartford, CT. Richard B. Hanson built new rectangular exhaust headers and engineered the erection of the engine and its foundation. Harold Foster aligned the engine, grouted the cylinder and main bearing, supplied and connected the heavy steam and exhaust pipes, cleaned and polished throughout. He enlisted Ed Lundwall's help to rebuild the piston and some of the valve gear. Paul Merriam nickel welded the broken cast iron cylinder head cover with an almost invisible weld. The rigging from Stratton, ME was largely done by Jeff Berry and Bob Merriam with the important assistance of Nancy Merriam, Paul Merriam and Charles Arthur Moore. This is probably the only engine designed and built by George H. Corliss that is running under steam today.


Left side view of the Corliss


Right side view of the Corliss

Movie of the Corliss running. Double-click on the image to start the movie.

Movie of the Corliss running. Double-click on the image to start the movie.

Movie of the Corliss running. Double-click on the image to start the movie.


The moving crew at the mill in Stratton, ME.
Jeff Berry at the left, Robert Merriam at the right middle.

The following images show the Corliss engine in it's original location in Stratton Maine.


The Corliss engine was donated to the museum because the cylinder head was broken, most likely from getting a slug of water in the steam. A new cylinder head was made by the volunteers at the museum.

Corliss' most famous engine was the Centenial Engine that powered the Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia, PA.


For more information about the Museum please e-mail: Frederick Jaggi, President
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